Recent entries
 
By Galina Snurnikova on 12/9/2008 7:10 AM

Now I will describe conversion of functions created as external C libraries (dll) in Oracle. Usually these Oracle functions are defined as CREATE FUNCTION … AS external library … LANGUAGE C. The above statement publishes an external C library through a call specification. The similar specification in SQL Server can be written by means of CREATE FUNCTION… AS EXTERNAL NAME statement. Below, I will describe the steps how to deploy a C library in SQL Server. Suppose, we have the following user-define function defined as language C library in Oracle

 

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By Galina Snurnikova on 12/8/2008 7:54 AM

Oracle LOCALTIMESTAMP function returns current date and time in the session time zone. The returned value is of TIMESTAMP data type.  There can be two ways to convert this function to SQL Server 2005. The first is used when SQL Server database and client are situated in the same time zone. The second is used when SQL Server database and client are situated in different time zones. The problem is that GETDATE() function returns local time from SQL Server machine, not your local machine if you are connected to the server remo

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By Yuri Rusakov on 11/18/2008 1:13 PM

Conversion of output REF CURSOR parameter in an Oracle stored procedure depends on the way this procedure is used by caller code. There are two distinct ways to use REF CURSOR parameter, and they very seldom are both applied to the same procedure.

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By Galina Snurnikova on 11/18/2008 12:52 AM

I promised, I continue to describe database comparison tools, which I happened to use. The next tool was Apex SQL Diff 2005.14. The connection is performed quickly. The interesting feature is that the tool can create a database snapshot and compare a database and a snapshot. The other useful feature is that it creates an optional backup of altered database before synchronization and you can return the synchronized database in the previous state. Apex SQL Diff can compare nearly all SQL Server objects.

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By Galina Snurnikova on 11/18/2008 12:31 AM

In my previous post I wrote about free tools for database comparison. Now I will make a review of some paid products. The next tool I tried was SQLDBCompare 2.4. This program is paid. It costs $129.00 to $599.00. It supports SQL Server 2000 and 2005. You can compare just standard objects by means of this tool (tables, check constraints, primary keys, foreign keys, indexes, views, DML triggers, stored procedures and user-defined functions). The convenient feature is that you can synchronize each database object by copying the object from one database to another. The unpleasant things are error messages on closing and during object synchronization.

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By Galina Snurnikova on 11/18/2008 12:22 AM

Every DBA encounters a situation when he/she has to compare two databases or schemas. There may be a production and a development database in your system. How to compare them quickly and effectively and make the production database equal to the development one?

Nowadays you can find several tools that will help you to do this. They differ in price, supported objects, variants of synchronization script representation and database platforms supported. Let’s review them.

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By Yuri Kovtun on 11/17/2008 5:02 PM

 Microsoft provides two different tools, which support upsizing of Access database to SQL Server: Access Upsizing wizard and SQL Server Migration Assistant (SSMA). I believe that SSMA is the best solution for most of the cases.

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By Yuri Rusakov on 11/17/2008 1:49 PM

We should modify all DML statements that work with emulated temporary table. It is necessary because we need to use s_id and s_lt columns to provide session isolation.

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By Yuri Rusakov on 11/17/2008 1:38 PM

 
Here is the promised solution for emulating GTTs functionality in SQL Server.
We convert each source GTT to a common SQL Server table with two additional columns: s_id, which will store current session id, and s_lt, which will contain the login time of the session.
 
 

 

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